Sudoku Games

Looking for some Mind Teasing Games?

Look no further. For at Sudokuwizz we have all the ultimate in handy and addictive mind sudoku puzzles. Number puzzles were in existence way back in the 18th century and experiments with “Magic Squares” led to the publishing of a partially completed 9×9 magic square with 3×3 sub-squares on November 19, 1892. These puzzles required arithmetic instead of logic to solve. Modern Sudoku came into being when a 74-year-old retired architect and freelance puzzle constructor from Indiana, embarked on a quest to devise a simple, yet intriguing number puzzle. Howard Grans added a third dimension (a regional restriction) to the structure and gave more precedence to logic as opposed to arithmetic. The puzzle had a partially completed grid like structure and required the solver to fill in the rest of the details. This was first published in New York by specialty puzzle publisher Dell Magazines.

In April 1984, the Monthly Nikolist introduced the puzzle in Japan and was called “Suuji wa dokushin ni kagiru”, which translates to “The numbers must be single”, “the numbers must occur only once”. At a later date, the puzzle was named Su Do Ku which meant “Single”. Nikoli later released more symmetric versions and it became a phenomenon in Japan. It wasn’t until two decades later that Sudoku went global. In 1997, Wayne Gould, a retired Hong Kong Judge came across a partly completed Sudoku puzzle in a Japanese bookstore and got hooked. He then spent a considerable amount of his time in developing a computer program to generate Sudoku puzzles quickly. And knowing that British newspapers had a penchant for publishing puzzles and crosswords, he managed to promote Sudoku to The Times in Britain, which launched it on 12 November 2004.

The Daily mail joined the Sudoku bandwagon and soon, The Daily Telegraph, Nationwide News and others biggies such as The Guardian, The Sun and The Independent followed suit. Sudoku had gone global. And there was no stopping it. Since then, Sudoku has spawned a legion of dedicated books, TV series, Mobile Apps, Video games and International Championship tournaments.

A basic Sudoku game has a 9×9 grid with 3×3 regions with some scattered numbers, sometimes sprinkled generously based on the level of difficulty. There are several variations of this basic structure and Sudoku now comes in a multitude of avatars – From Mini, Cross Sums, Killer, Photo to Alphabetical and Hypersudoku, the challenges and innovation are endless.

So get the thinking cap on and crack those digits. It doesn’t get better than this!